Little Farmers and Black Point Round 2

We arrived back at Little Farmer’s Cay after motor-sailing north from George Town. Seas were fairly calm with extremely light winds…it wasn’t as hot as our trip down, so we were thankful for that.

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After roughly seven hours, we anchored in the same spot as last…strong current, but excellent holding in between Little Farmers Cay and Great Guana Cay, right out in front of Little Farmers Yacht Club. Summer was approaching: we had a few strong squalls over the few days we stayed. Riding out the storms proved extra interesting since current controlled the boat’s direction rather than the wind. When the rain and winds passed through, the cockpit often got soaked because winds came from the sides or behind.
1We heard from other cruisers that there was a population of sea turtles that lived in the harbor of Little Farmers Cay. We decided to scope it out and took our GoPro with us in the dinghy, hoping to get some underwater footage. The day prior, we noticed a handful of dime sized jellyfish passing the boat. On this day, we stumbled upon several huge masses of the jellyfish near the shore. At first, it looked like a bunch of seaweed floating along the top of the water. Upon further inspection, we discovered that we found hundreds of thousands of the little jellyfish floating in the water.

Although the water was only five or so feet deep and crystal clear, there were so many jellyfish in spots that you couldn’t see through to the bottom. And that’s where we found the sea turtles. It was as if we stumbled upon a jellyfish buffet. We didn’t need to enter the harbor to see the turtles, they swam among the jellyfish and coral. We got some great GoPro footage and the turtles didn’t seem to mind our company.


After a few days, we headed back to our second home, aka Black Point! We were excited to head back and had a fun 10 mile trip north under sail. The winds were pretty piped up from the southeast. In about 15 knots of wind with a following sea, we got up to 7.5 knots…with just the headsail! Troy and I shared the helm this trip…I was really starting to feel more comfortable at the helm while under sail.

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And after a few hours, we were approaching Black Point, this time from the south. The winds really picked up, blowing over 20 knots…it felt like we were flying! This time, for two reasons, we could tell the cruising season was coming to an end. First, there were fewer boats than our first time in the anchorage. Many people had probably already headed back to the states. And secondly, the spring/summer weather pattern of thunderstorms was obvious. During our second day, we had another day of scattered showers. Sometimes these showers brought along wind, and others just rain.

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Black Point meant we were going to have a chance to do laundry…with the best view! While doing laundry, we met another couple about our age, Rylie and Allie on SV Generations. We got to talking and became fast friends! We decided to meet up at Scorpio’s (for 2 for 1 rum punches, of course). Cruisers gathered at Scorprio’s, the nightly ritual. After most headed back to their boats, Troy, Rylie, Allie, and myself decided to stay and hang out with the locals. Many rum punches were consumed…along with sharing stories and plenty of dancing. I do not dance in public…but I did that night.

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We decorated a few dollar bills to hang above the bar, leaving our “We’ve been here” mark. We climbed up and stuck them on the ceiling…we’ll definitely check to see if they’re still there next year! That was a pretty late night…even the dogs slept in the next morning.

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Over the next week or so, we hiked the island and snorkeled several places nearby. The reefs and coral heads in the area are healthy and thriving. Most are colorful and teeming with fish and sea life. We spent most of our time snorkeling just outside and south of the Black Point anchorage. These spots aren’t marked on any of our guides, we found them just by dinghying (I may have just made that word up) around and dropping the anchor when we found a spot with a few coral heads. The water is warming up…each day it gets easier and easier to hop in.


When I wrote about Black Point last, I mentioned that our favorite part of Black Point was the people…the feeling has now increased exponentially. From the late nights hanging out at Scorprio’s to the kids climbing the ladders on the dock to the simple daily interactions in the street, the people of Black Point make you feel like you’re at home.
A prime example of their hospitality was when we met Bread Boi, owner of several vacation rental homes. He knew we weren’t ready to leave Black Point, but we had a package to pick up at Staniel Cay, a few islands north. Rather than charging us to rent one of his Boston Whaler skiffs, he let us borrow it for the afternoon! We just had to replace the gas we used. We were blown away by his generosity…and frankly his trust in letting four strangers (Allie and Rylie came with us for a day trip, of course) take his boat.
When we left Black Point in the skiff, the four of us were laughing when the boat jumped up out of the water. The 115hp engine moved the skiff A LOT faster than the four of us had gotten used to in our sailboats. We returned after several hours with our package. My mom had sent us a care package with some things we were missing and couldn’t get here in the Bahamas…protein bars, Crystal Light, 3M boat wax, and the icing on the cake…an XM satellite radio adapter for our stereo.

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We spent a total of over 25 days at Black Point…and we loved every one of them! We made new friends and slowed down, island style. We can’t wait to reach Black Point next year.

Home Away from Home

Our next stop heading south was the anchorage at Black Point on the northern end of Great Guana Cay. It is the second most populated settlement in the Exumas after George Town, home to about 250 residents. The anchorage itself is quite roomy, we counted thirty-five boats on the busiest night during our stay. Strong northeast winds were in the forecast, so this spot would provide us with the protection we needed. Although we couldn’t get tucked up close to the beach, waves did not have the opportunity to build and rock us around because of the shallow sandbar that extended far out from the beach.

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We hadn’t made it to shore before a squall hit the area. Lasting only twenty minutes, the dark clouds encroached upon us, dropped some heavy rain, and cleared up in time for sunset. I was looking forward to checking out the laundry facility; we had heard that it is the best in the Exumas. The next morning, we arrived at the laundry facility with two loads to do…we also brought along our laptop, iPad, and cell phones hoping to connect to the free Wi-Fi. We learned that the laundromat also sells basic marine supplies, snacks, and T-shirts. The shaded pavilion just outside the laundromat seemed to be a cruiser’s hangout. We met several cruiser couples and families and made plans to meet for Happy Hour at Scorpio’s that evening. We chatted and surfed the net while we waited for our laundry…all with a great view of the anchorage.

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That night and the next night were spent at Scorpio’s enjoying 2 for 1 Rum Punches, sharing stories and experiences with other cruisers. On Saturday, cruisers met again for the cruiser dinner at Lorraine’s café. We had a great time hanging out with our new friends and enjoying hamburgers, hotdogs, wings, fries, rum punch, vodka lemonade…all you can eat/drink…for only $20 per person! It was dark out by the time we left Lorraine’s, but rather than heading back to Salty Tails, we decided to entertain an offer from another boat in the anchorage. Along with Jess and Brent from SV Seaduction, we headed over to Beacon Won in our dinghies. After tying up amongst several other dinghies, we climbed aboard. Captain Bruce built the nearly 70-foot vessel himself five years ago. The sailboat is used to charter youth groups, educational trips, and mission trips, etc. We toured this fascinating vessel and explored everything from the galley, helm, engine room, and sleeping accommodations and then swapped stories on the stern upper deck. Finally, we headed back to the boat to settle in for the windiest night.

After the weekend concluded, we were really starting to feel at home. The friendly people of Black Point were warm and welcoming. We often found ourselves stopped in the street talking with the locals about the island, our plans, sailing, the upcoming regatta in George Town…just like old friends. Even the kids of Black Point share the adults’ charming qualities. Dressed in their green school uniforms, they always waved, smiled, and said hi on their way to or from school. And on weekends, boys and girls often played near the water or on the docks, fearless of the nurse sharks swimming nearby. The settlement was much more laid back and quiet compared to Staniel Cay, no mega yachts here. The settlement offers free RO water (reverse osmosis) for cruisers, just another example of their great hospitality. We had plans to leave early in the next week, but we ended up staying for a total of 15 nights! The next week was spent exploring the town, completing maintenance jobs, and hanging out with friends. Between the awesome cruiser community and the locals, we definitely recommend Black Point!

Since we had tried out the two restaurants, we of course, had to try out the third: Deshamons. I tried the conch burger, Troy had a hamburger…both excellent! That afternoon, we stopped by the home of Lorraine’s Mom. She baked and sold the most delectable homemade bread, renowned around the Exumas. We enjoyed eating pieces of the coconut bread on our walk back to the dinghy dock. I froze a few pieces in effort to make it last longer!

A day or two later, the mailboat arrived. When you read mailboat, think floating semi-truck, for size comparison. Because the Exumas are far from Nassau, island communities receive their goods via mailboats that come approximately three times per month. When the mailboat arrives, everyone comes out to unload. Trucks, golf carts, and helpful hands work into the night unloading and sorting goods and supplies. I even spotted a little guy walk away with a new pet bunny! I was just as excited, the next day we rode over and loaded up on fresh fruits and veggies from Adderley’s Friendly store.

Nearing the end of our time in Black Point, we decided to take a dinghy ride north to Gaulin Cay to visit the caves and iguanas. We crossed over Dotham cut, which was still pretty churned up from the strong winds that had been blowing through. We drug the dinghy ashore and enjoyed the beach to ourselves. Afterwards, on our way back to the boat, we explored the mangroves just inside the cut and discovered a beached sailboat. The last registration sticker dated 2015, but the harsh saltwater had taken its toll, making it appear the boat had been there for quite some time.

After some planning, we decided that our next stop would be Little Farmers Cay, just at the southern end of Great Guana, 10 miles south. We were sad to leave; Black Point has made a special place in our hearts…we will be back!