Little Farmers and Black Point Round 2

We arrived back at Little Farmer’s Cay after motor-sailing north from George Town. Seas were fairly calm with extremely light winds…it wasn’t as hot as our trip down, so we were thankful for that.

0

After roughly seven hours, we anchored in the same spot as last…strong current, but excellent holding in between Little Farmers Cay and Great Guana Cay, right out in front of Little Farmers Yacht Club. Summer was approaching: we had a few strong squalls over the few days we stayed. Riding out the storms proved extra interesting since current controlled the boat’s direction rather than the wind. When the rain and winds passed through, the cockpit often got soaked because winds came from the sides or behind.
1We heard from other cruisers that there was a population of sea turtles that lived in the harbor of Little Farmers Cay. We decided to scope it out and took our GoPro with us in the dinghy, hoping to get some underwater footage. The day prior, we noticed a handful of dime sized jellyfish passing the boat. On this day, we stumbled upon several huge masses of the jellyfish near the shore. At first, it looked like a bunch of seaweed floating along the top of the water. Upon further inspection, we discovered that we found hundreds of thousands of the little jellyfish floating in the water.

Although the water was only five or so feet deep and crystal clear, there were so many jellyfish in spots that you couldn’t see through to the bottom. And that’s where we found the sea turtles. It was as if we stumbled upon a jellyfish buffet. We didn’t need to enter the harbor to see the turtles, they swam among the jellyfish and coral. We got some great GoPro footage and the turtles didn’t seem to mind our company.


After a few days, we headed back to our second home, aka Black Point! We were excited to head back and had a fun 10 mile trip north under sail. The winds were pretty piped up from the southeast. In about 15 knots of wind with a following sea, we got up to 7.5 knots…with just the headsail! Troy and I shared the helm this trip…I was really starting to feel more comfortable at the helm while under sail.

3
And after a few hours, we were approaching Black Point, this time from the south. The winds really picked up, blowing over 20 knots…it felt like we were flying! This time, for two reasons, we could tell the cruising season was coming to an end. First, there were fewer boats than our first time in the anchorage. Many people had probably already headed back to the states. And secondly, the spring/summer weather pattern of thunderstorms was obvious. During our second day, we had another day of scattered showers. Sometimes these showers brought along wind, and others just rain.

3a
Black Point meant we were going to have a chance to do laundry…with the best view! While doing laundry, we met another couple about our age, Rylie and Allie on SV Generations. We got to talking and became fast friends! We decided to meet up at Scorpio’s (for 2 for 1 rum punches, of course). Cruisers gathered at Scorprio’s, the nightly ritual. After most headed back to their boats, Troy, Rylie, Allie, and myself decided to stay and hang out with the locals. Many rum punches were consumed…along with sharing stories and plenty of dancing. I do not dance in public…but I did that night.

20180518_222337

We decorated a few dollar bills to hang above the bar, leaving our “We’ve been here” mark. We climbed up and stuck them on the ceiling…we’ll definitely check to see if they’re still there next year! That was a pretty late night…even the dogs slept in the next morning.

20180519_102635
Over the next week or so, we hiked the island and snorkeled several places nearby. The reefs and coral heads in the area are healthy and thriving. Most are colorful and teeming with fish and sea life. We spent most of our time snorkeling just outside and south of the Black Point anchorage. These spots aren’t marked on any of our guides, we found them just by dinghying (I may have just made that word up) around and dropping the anchor when we found a spot with a few coral heads. The water is warming up…each day it gets easier and easier to hop in.


When I wrote about Black Point last, I mentioned that our favorite part of Black Point was the people…the feeling has now increased exponentially. From the late nights hanging out at Scorprio’s to the kids climbing the ladders on the dock to the simple daily interactions in the street, the people of Black Point make you feel like you’re at home.
A prime example of their hospitality was when we met Bread Boi, owner of several vacation rental homes. He knew we weren’t ready to leave Black Point, but we had a package to pick up at Staniel Cay, a few islands north. Rather than charging us to rent one of his Boston Whaler skiffs, he let us borrow it for the afternoon! We just had to replace the gas we used. We were blown away by his generosity…and frankly his trust in letting four strangers (Allie and Rylie came with us for a day trip, of course) take his boat.
When we left Black Point in the skiff, the four of us were laughing when the boat jumped up out of the water. The 115hp engine moved the skiff A LOT faster than the four of us had gotten used to in our sailboats. We returned after several hours with our package. My mom had sent us a care package with some things we were missing and couldn’t get here in the Bahamas…protein bars, Crystal Light, 3M boat wax, and the icing on the cake…an XM satellite radio adapter for our stereo.

20180520_145928
We spent a total of over 25 days at Black Point…and we loved every one of them! We made new friends and slowed down, island style. We can’t wait to reach Black Point next year.

Exuma Land and Sea Park, Part II

Next up in the Land and Sea Park: Cambridge Cay! Cambridge is the last major cay of the Exuma Land and Sea Park. We set sail southbound and since it was a smooth ride, we decided to investigate a little “problem” we had been experiencing while underway. For the last few sails, our bilge pump would cut on and expel some water. We weren’t sure where the water was getting in, but we had our fingers crossed that it would be a simple fix. Something like that could potentially be a major issue, but since the bilge cut on only while underway and only pumped out a small amount of water, Troy had a hunch that it may be one of a few minor problems. We emptied two of the lazarettes in the cockpit, allowing us to see the hoses to our cockpit floor drains. A small stream of water (imagine a water fountain), came through a pinhole in one hose.

Since water only comes that far up the hose when heeled, it only leaked while underway. YES! We had found our problem…and it was by far the easiest fix. Troy repaired the leak: now the water would stay outside! After reorganizing the cockpit, we enjoyed the rest of our sail to Cambridge Cay.

As we entered the protected anchorage, we were hailed on our VHF radio by the mooring attendants…all the mooring balls were taken, except for a mooring ball meant for vessels up to 150 feet. Since the park operates on a first come, first served basis, we would take it until a standard sized ball became available. This was our first experience with mooring attendants. Chuck and Carmen on SV Soul Mates were cruisers who volunteered to oversee the moorings. During the months of March and April, they lived aboard their catamaran at Cambridge Cay. Chuck and Carmen were incredibly hospitable and made Cambridge Cay feel like a close-knit community! They invited us aboard their boat to tell us all about Cambridge Cay and the places to go nearby.

That afternoon, they arranged a group to ride over to Rocky Dundas, a set of caves across the channel. We immediately agreed to go with the group; how nice it was to travel together with several dinghies, a buddy system. We suited up, grabbed our snorkel gear, and crossed the channel to reach the caves. It was a bit rough that afternoon; many guides suggest visiting Rocky Dundas on a calm day at low-tide. The seven or so boats tied off to the two dinghy moorings outside the caves and bounced around like bumper cars. Thankfully rubber boats don’t leave dents! Chuck described the best approach to the caves: swim under the opening and into the tall cave; quickly get your footing and climb out onto the cave floor. On a calm day, this was fairly easy, but because the afternoon turned out to be quite choppy, we had to have our wits and swimming legs on!

We didn’t expect to see such beautiful coral on our swim over to the cave. An abundance of fish and sea fans swayed with the current; the bright sun made the colors of coral pop.

We headed through the cave opening and popped our heads up once inside. We took off our fins, tossed them onto the cave floor and climbed out before getting knocked over by the waves crashing through the opening.

Once inside, it was really a sight. The cave ceiling stretched high above head and the sun’s rays shone through the opening at the top, illuminating the inside of the cave. The cave floor, although rocky, had been worn smooth by the water over time.

The pounding of the waves echoed inside. In furthest corner of the cave, we wrote our names in the sand for good luck, a tradition we all took part in. After returning to the boats, I climbed in while Troy swam and explored the second cave with others from our group.
A standard sized mooring became available after our first night. This turned out to be good timing because Chuck let us know that a large yacht was arriving hoping to take a mooring. We would be doing a bit of shuffling so that everyone could fit! Before we had a chance to move, the yacht’s tender (an impressive Everglades center console) pulled up to our port side. Graciously offering us a bottle of wine, the crew member thanked us for making room for the approaching yacht. We would have, of course, moved anyway, but we didn’t turn down a nice bottle of wine!
Over the next few days at Cambridge Cay, we met some great people! We enjoyed a sunset and drinks at the sandbar with other cruisers and played games aboard a neighboring boat. We took another group trip to “The Aquarium” and snorkeled a sunken plane. Cambridge Cay turned out to be a great staging point for some of the best snorkeling spots we’ve visited in the Bahamas.
The Aquarium is one of the most popular snorkel locations in the Land and Sea Park. Aptly named, the site is a massive shrub covered rock above the waterline, but below is an impressive coral reef teeming with a variety of fish. After our group hopped in the water, we were immediately greeted by a school of fish…clearly hoping for handouts.

We snorkeled around the wall of coral, spotting trigger fish, lobster, snapper, sea urchin, angelfish, parrotfish, just to name a few.

It had been a couple of weeks since we left Nassau so we were beginning to run low on water and gas for the dinghy. We thanked Carmen and Chuck for their hospitality and let them know that we would be leaving in the morning. A few hours later, we got a call on the radio from the neighbor boat (actually another 150+ foot yacht) letting us know they had a gift for us courtesy of Chuck and Carmen… water and gas!

We enjoyed another few days at Cambridge Cay; this was turning out to be one of our best stops yet! Soon though, we moved on to the first settlement since Nassau: Staniel Cay. We needed to do some resupplying and were going to enjoy our first meal out in six months at the yacht club!